Communauté francophone des fans de System Of A Down : France, Belgique, Suisse, Luxembourg, Canada, etc
 
AccueilAccueil  CalendrierCalendrier  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  MembresMembres  GroupesGroupes  Connexion  

Partagez | 
 

 [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
AuteurMessage
Silvano
Choking Chick
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 365
Age : 28
Date d'inscription : 13/06/2005

MessageSujet: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Sam 3 Déc - 20:17

Interview trouvée par le biais de soadomized
Elle sort du schéma question/réponse et raconte quelques périodes vécues par le groupe
C'est vraiment enorme tant par sa taille que son contenu Smile


The Best of 2 Worlds
System of a Down remade hard rock in its own confounding image but still draws inspiration from the unglamorous streets of Hollywood

~ By STEVE APPLEFORD ~

This is how the beginning ends: right here on the unglamorous streets of east Hollywood, the land of no film stars, at a seedy motel in Little Armenia. The band System of a Down is about to begin passing from one world and into another, and hardly anyone seems to realize what is happening. It’s just business as usual for a rising quartet of rockers known mainly to a young cult of metal fanatics always hungry for more, more, more. The band has returned to the old neighborhood to make a music video for a new tune, “Chop Suey,” a frantic, apocalyptic meditation on drugs and confusion, of jangly acoustic guitars and speed-metal riffs and epic non sequiturs. The September 2001 release date of the group’s sophomore album, Toxicity, is still weeks away, but some tracks are already crowding the Internet. Something is brewing.

And where better to begin than at the Oak Tree Inn? There is history here. In one of these rooms, bassist Shavo Odadjian witnessed his first scene of sexual conquest as an eight-year-old on a skateboard looking through a motel room window. He grew up in this neighborhood, not far from the childhood home of guitarist Daron Malakian, and he still remembers all those mysterious ladies of the night and day standing on the sidewalk beneath the palm trees as young Shavo was driven to school at 7:30 a.m. Who were these strange women in the big heels and short-short skirts? They’re waiting for the bus, Shavo’s mom insisted. They’re going to work.

Then there was that time, years later, when Mötley Crüe was at the strip club across the street making a video, with a crowd of big hair and leather and string bikinis spilling out into the sunlight in 1987. Shavo met his first rock star that day. “There was a Shakey’s Pizza, a hooker motel, and a strip club on my block,” he says. “Isn’t that great? Awesome. The best and worst of everything. And I think I learned more from the worst.”

Now here he is, making his own rock video, a budding rock star himself with a shaved skull and a goatee braided into a rope hanging off the end of his chin. This wasn’t the first time for System of a Down by any means. There was that minor radio/video hit in 1998, “Sugar,” but there are signs that things will be different this time. Anticipation is in the air, and it’s the kind that can’t be manufactured by your typical Under Assistant West Coast Promotion Man. Word went out on the band website just days earlier, inviting fans to appear in the video, and hundreds of young men and women traveled from as far away as Illinois and New Mexico, maybe farther, an army of System fans in matching black T-shirts cheering on the band in the Oak Tree courtyard through take after bruising take of “Chop Suey.”

Between shots on day two of the production, band members find ways to kill time. Singer Serj Tankian autographs albums and body parts and meets with the accountant. Others retire to a rented motor home loaded up with McDonald’s cuisine for Malakian. Comfort food, the same thing he ate every day on the road in Europe, shying away from that weird foreign grub the locals like. McDonald’s burgers and fries and shakes. The same stuff he had for breakfast, the same crap he’s eating now.

That may explain a lot. Malakian is the complex central nervous system of System of a Down, an anxious, brilliant, obsessive sound scientist. Before this, he was in a band with Tankian called Soil, a project that reflected their shared interest in early progressive rock, anything from Frank Zappa to Yes, plus a certain weakness for speedy Slayer-style death-metal riffs. But talk to them now, and they will speak much less of metal and more about the Beatles. The hard stuff is a given. Soil ended, and System was born out of Malakian’s desire to fit his wildest dreams of noise and melody, rage and hilarity, the whole confounding landscape of sound, into pop tunes never more than a few minutes in length. The result is something like a mad, hard-rock version of what Brian Wilson used to call a “pocket symphony,” an entire universe of pure, epic sound and beauty in a small, perfect package. Toxicity expands on this ideal, and will serve as a band foundation for everything to come.

But no one can see this yet, not in 2001: that, amid the band’s urban racket and crazed visions of rage and politics and joy and excitement, System will redefine what hard rock can be. Loud, delicate, serious, hilarious. In a few weeks, Toxicity will debut at the top of the pop album charts. They will be on the radio, on the TV. There will be rioting in the streets. Celebrity baseball. A check in the mail.

Just not yet. Malakian reaches for a McBurger. “It hasn’t sold one copy yet,” he says with another nervous laugh, as the others come and go to say their goodbyes for the night. “But I feel so proud of it, I don’t care if it sells any copies. It’s a good piece of work. I’ve got to be behind it before anyone else gets behind it.”

True enough. And one more thing: These guys are going to be huge.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

There is a stack of pizzas waiting for you in the little room. But Mr. Serj Tankian (pronounced Say-rj Tank-ee-an) will have none of this and none of your McDonald’s, either. He is a smiling monk in pinstripes, a dark, beatific presence on a vegetarian diet, and a perfect host alternating from gentle high priest to grinning rock ’n’ roll Groucho. He shares a couch with Malakian, who wears an elegant coat of black reptilian leather. They are an epic pair, just sitting there quietly, rock stars at rest.

The release of Toxicity not only represented a milestone of impossible commercial success, but it also went far in establishing the two System frontmen as possessing as much potential as Page & Plant. Together, they have created an unlikely sound mix of musical sophistication colliding with jagged bursts of electricity and an intense hurricane of words on politics, war, cocaine casualties, and rough sex.

“I can’t say we don’t get into arguments,” says Malakian. “I get pissed sometimes, he gets pissed sometimes. Giving birth is not the most simple thing to do, so it’s got to be painful sometimes. I’ve had a few episodes, but at the end of it now, we’re close to done. As long as it’s great, and me and him are still sitting together, and I don’t hate him and he doesn’t hate me, then everything was right, everything happened for a reason.”

The occasion now is a studio visit in mid-December 2004, somewhere on that slice of earth and oblivion where North Hollywood meets Burbank and not much else. A new batch of songs are being mixed and remixed here, so they’ve come to play a handful of tracks for visitors and to explain their plan to release two albums in 2005, Mezmerize and Hypnotize, each barely 40 minutes long. Malakian is not a fan of lengthy albums, so he’d rather just split up the songs. “Attention spans just aren’t what they use to be,” he says sadly.

It’s soon very clear that System of a Down aims to further expand the boundaries of hard, hard rock with its first new studio project since 2002’s Steal This Album!, blending melody, aggression, restraint, and the usual boundless experimentation across two discs – beginning with Mezmerize, and followed six months later by Hypnotize. The albums were recorded over the summer of 2004 in the monumental Laurel Canyon mansion owned by coproducer Rick Rubin. Malakian says he is anxious to move forward. “Why should we make another Toxicity?” he says. “I crave to grow. I don’t want to stay doing the same thing just because it worked. That is boring.”

He goes on: “We’re all still finding our places in this band to where we’re all comfortable together. It’s like growing pains. As a producer, I’ve been thinking of the sound of this record for like three years, and what kind of amp should I use, and listening to albums and thinking, ‘That’s a great drum tone!’ The Stooges’ Fun House was a reference. … I’m blown away by the way this record sounds.”

That ambition can be heard in the driving, playful, punishing hard rock of “Kill Rock and Roll” and the taunting “Cigaro,” with its wild, slashing flourishes of guitar and Malakian singing crazily: “My cock is bigger that yours/My cock can walk right through the door!” “B.Y.O.B.” delivers a blunt anti-war screed, setting livid, dizzying shouts against tranquil passages that could have been lifted from P-Funk: “Everybody’s going to the party … dancing in the desert blowing up the sunshine.” On Hypnotize, System again mixes the political and personal, stretching from Tiananmen Square to Malakian sitting in his car “waiting for my girl” on the title song.

“It was when I was with my ex-girlfriend, and I remember sitting in the alley waiting for her to come out of her house,” Malakian says. “And a lot of thoughts were going through my head, like …”

“Don’t let out too much,” Tankian says quickly, with a laugh.

“Oh, yeah, huh?” Malakian turns to me. “Oh, yeah, it’s not written about anything. It’s a bunch of bullshit!”

The only mystery is which songs will land on the imminent Mezmerize, and which will have to wait until November for Hypnotized. Even Serj wants to know. And Malakian mentions that he wants to put “Hypnotized” first on Mesmerize, and not on Hypnotize.

“Brain fuck!” says Tankian with a laugh. “Great! I love it. You keep your band members guessing, that’s the best thing about it!”

Malakian is also doing more singing here. On the surface, that may seem a strange choice for a band already fronted by one of the most dynamic voices in popular music, but Daron’s frazzled shrieks make for a startling and engaging contrast. “I think we’re doing some freaky shit on this one,” says Tankian, who has always shared some vocal duties with the guitarist. “We both are.”

This is a self-sufficient operation. Daron’s father, Vartan Malakian, did the artwork for both albums. Shavo has directed or codirected most band videos since 2002. And Serj keeps busy with his own label, promoting and producing new acts. He’s also published books of his poetry, and is active as a part of Axis of Justice, a political action group cofounded with Tom Morello, guitarist for Audioslave and Rage Against the Machine.

Daron stays to himself at home, working, writing, playing, recording on the same boombox recorder he’s had for years. He’ll sometimes send his girlfriend away for weeks at a time, just so he can concentrate. She seems to understand. He attends the occasional baseball game or hockey contest, the loudest heckler with the best seats.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Silvano
Choking Chick
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 365
Age : 28
Date d'inscription : 13/06/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Sam 3 Déc - 20:17

Malakian is threatening to leave. It is November 10, 2005, and the band has just arrived backstage for an epic media event at the old Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, where the gathered music press awaits a System of a Down conference in the main room. Reporters and critics have just heard the new Hypnotized blaring above them, lyrics flashed on a video screen, while dining on shrimp and other pricey snacks, beer, and soft drinks. But there’s trouble.

The bandleader has just seen someone he wants nothing to do with. Daron is looking for the exit, and then the quartet steps into a small dressing room and closes the door. I am in there with them, and I learn nothing. They speak and argue in Armenian, talking over each other, with an occasional phrase in English. (Shavo: “We’ve got something to do, so let’s just do it.”) Then they hear Shavo and Daron being introduced from the stage, and Daron mutters “What the fuck?” as he’s ushered away.

On a table sits a box of chili burgers and the same tofu corndogs the band first tasted with Rubin during the making of Toxicity at Cello Studios on Sunset. Serj pours himself some tea as he and drummer John Dolmayan sit to chat.

In other encounters with interviewers and photographers, Dolmayan is frequently the first to head for the exit. Today he has much to say: on the idea of releasing two albums in one year, about the cost of CDs, and the mystery of radio and platinum sales.

After all, no sane person would write music like this and expect it to land on your local rock station. It’s like a miracle. Or, it was the first time. “Listen, for whatever reason, radio and MTV and the press catered to the System of a Down,” Dolmayan says. “We have no idea why. It was aligned. Something happened, and it worked out. It’s as shocking to us as to anyone else, believe me. We don’t know what the fuck is going on here.”

And so they are back for more, barely six months after releasing Mezmerize and touring the world, after the tapes sat mostly unheard in a safe. But the promotional cycle for the last record only ended less than a week ago, on November 3, when they did the European MTV awards, in Lisbon, and with Daron refusing to have the band seen strolling down a red carpet.

“In the ’60s, the Beatles used to release at least a record a year, sometimes two, sometimes even more,” Tankian says. “It’s a modern phenomenon, due to the commercial restrictions of today’s world and the money poured into radio and videos and all of this, that people want to focus you in on one record, because there’s a lot of money being spent on it, etc. Maybe it will commercially work against us, but I doubt it. It doesn’t matter, ultimately. This is what we wanted to do, and this is the way that we’re doing it. I’ve been talking to a lot of artist friends, and now they want to do it.”

Dolmayan adds, “I’m sure the record companies won’t like it and will probably institute some law against it … . They’re so used to cheating people that they think everybody is cheating them.”

He’s still irritated by his last visit to a record shop, where he stocked up on John Lennon music. Each one, he says, cost about $18. “And I felt raped.”

Tankian leans closer. “You should have bought them in Armenia, because they were all $3 apiece because they were all duplicates.”

“Those are all bootlegs,” Dolmayan replies, “but that’s not the answer, either.”

“I’m just kidding.”

“The answer is not to take the livelihood away from the artist. The answer is to make it affordable for everyone.”

When their turn comes to step in front of the gathered press, Malakian takes their place in front of me. He sits quickly and lights his glass pipe. It is filled with some unnamed herb that he does not share. But it seems to comfort him. Daron is a conduit of intense musical energy, but things do occasionally slow down for him. A prime example is the song “Lonely Day,” which comes near the end of Hypnotized, a respite of calm and sadness before the big finish.

“I actually fuckin’ wrote that the moment shit was going down,” he explains. “It was a relationship issue. I was stuck between two phone calls, two different people, two different exes. It was just a miserable day.”

After the press conference, the band is making its way back up to the suite when Malakian is stopped by a hairless bulldog of a man from a daily newspaper. He wants to know how Daron justifies the violence and darkness in his music. The musician brings up “Lonely Day,” but his interrogator focuses on the drugs and whores elsewhere. And when Malakian says that’s what he sees in life, the reporter challenges: “You don’t see that.”

Daron laughs at him. “How do you know what I see?” He doesn’t mention the old neighborhood or the grandparents still living in Iraq. Or what anyone in the world could see with a quick trip to the other side of Hollywood.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Upstairs in the suite, there is another box of chili burgers, plus those tofu hotdogs. They pose for some quick pictures, Shavo and his braided beard always in dramatic profile, and then start to trickle out, their big moment with the press behind them for now.

A friend has hooked up Shavo with a pair of tickets to an unannounced performance by comedian Dave Chappelle. Daron isn’t so sure. Plus, he’s got his own plans tonight, with some important music to buy. “I want to make sure he’s not going to come out and just say hello,” he says, “and that he’s going to do 90 minutes.”

“No one does 90 minutes!”

“I do,” Malakian says, and then he’s gone, off to Amoeba Music to scour the racks.

That leaves Odadjian the last rock star in the room, on the cell tracking down friends, talking to his dad, talking to me about his girlfriends, how he wants to share his perks with friends back on earth. He’s also excited about a planned recording project with GZA of the Wu-Tang Clan. Shavo reclines on a couch, flipping through the room’s pay channels, past the porn selection, stopping at a Will Ferrell movie.

He looks relaxed, but he’s anxious. He’d really love to take one of his old pals with him, someone who grew up like him, someone else who knows Hollywood as a real-life urban landscape, not just parties and showbiz. “The reason why we mention Hollywood so much is ’cause it’s always going to be a part of Daron and I,” he says. “Especially Daron and I.”

So he’s on the cell again: “Hey, bro. I’m inviting you right now, if you call me back in the next five minutes, to go see Dave Chappelle live at the Comedy Store. I have a car and everything. I have a room at the Roosevelt Hotel … . We’ve got to be there by 10:30. It’s almost 9. Call me, bro. I have one ticket. It’s badass.”

Within the hour, his friend meets him in the lobby, where the Hollywood party scene is in full effect. Starlets and actors and deal-makers and wannabes are spilling from poolside and out to the parking patio. Funnyman David Spade strolls right past, looking like D’Artagnan in a mustache and hair combed back into a swashbuckler’s wave.

Shavo is tempted to stay, but Chappelle is somewhere out there, waiting. And both ends of Hollywood will still be here when he gets back.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Tckt
Administrateur
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 9476
Age : 31
Localisation : Lille
Date d'inscription : 02/05/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Sam 3 Déc - 21:23

J'ai deja lu, mais merci !!

_________________
Twitter - SensCritique - Xbox Live
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.soad-fr.com
Le Chapelier Fou
Modératrice Tyrannique et Présidente des Groupies
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2654
Age : 34
Localisation : Sous mon Chapeau bien sur !!!
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Sam 3 Déc - 21:47

Bon nos petits traducteurs d'amour, a vos dicos !!! Mr. Green merciiii !!!!

_________________
LE CHEF IL TUE DES CHATONS !!!
Chapounette de Jo', Chapichou de Parencouille
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.harumscarum.canalblog.com
virgil-the-king
Deer Dancer
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 281
Age : 28
Localisation : Felletin
Date d'inscription : 28/06/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Sam 3 Déc - 22:23

allé pas de chichi on traduit en courant et en regardant en l'air ou plutot sans dico et sur le clavier !!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Le Chapelier Fou
Modératrice Tyrannique et Présidente des Groupies
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2654
Age : 34
Localisation : Sous mon Chapeau bien sur !!!
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Lun 5 Déc - 20:18

Bon, en attendant, moi je vais parler du reportage sur eux/interview de Serj, qui est paru dans Rock & Folk... Et ce qu'il dit m'a un peu... affraid mais en même temps on s'en doutait.

En particulier d'un truc, bon il parle de politique un peu, de l'engagement du groupe et aussi forcement des 2 albums et du fait que c'est Daron qui avait fait une grande partie. Il disait aussi que Shavo avait très mal vécut le fait que les journalistes francais lui parle tjs du fait qu'il a pas joué les lignes de basses sur les albums. Ils disent aussi que sur scène c'est Daron et ses amis et pas System, que c'est lui qu'est sur le devant de la scène et qu'entre les chansons c'est le seul qu'est eclairé...

Mais ce qui m'a le plus fait halluciné c'est Serj dit :
" - Soad c'est comme une démocratie. Tout le monde s'entend bien, y'a pas de problème c cool. Et comme dans une démocratie quand ça va pas du tout, les gens sourient pour cacher que tout va mal.
- Et là ?
- Bah tu vois, je souris. "

Et il dit aussi qu'apres la tournée il sortira un album solo pour montrer qui est Serj Tankian...

Et il donne aussi son avis sur plusieurs chansons connues pour etre engagées.

je vous conseil de la lire si vous tomber dessus.

_________________
LE CHEF IL TUE DES CHATONS !!!
Chapounette de Jo', Chapichou de Parencouille
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.harumscarum.canalblog.com
Jo'
Maître Capello Déchu
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 6949
Age : 29
Localisation : Lille
Date d'inscription : 16/05/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Lun 5 Déc - 20:31

Tu nous arranges le coup pour tomber dessus ?

En effet elle m'a l'air intéressante, voire dérangeante !
Le coup du "je souris", si je pige bien, c'est que SOAD va mal ? Shocked Ou alors peut-être s't'une 'tite "blagounette" ?

_________________

https://www.facebook.com/martintheisland
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://soad-fr.com
Silvano
Choking Chick
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 365
Age : 28
Date d'inscription : 13/06/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Lun 5 Déc - 20:33

Ah moi aussi je trouve ca surprenant voir bien dérangeant en effet Shocked
Si tu pouvais nous eclairé un peu... Mr. Green
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Le Chapelier Fou
Modératrice Tyrannique et Présidente des Groupies
avatar

Nombre de messages : 2654
Age : 34
Localisation : Sous mon Chapeau bien sur !!!
Date d'inscription : 17/05/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Lun 5 Déc - 20:43

vous etes en train de dire que je vais devoir lacher 4.80€ pour un article de 2 pages?! et qu'en + il faudra que je le tape ?!!! Si on attends le 15 du mois prochain il sera normalement en ligne...
Si vous pouvez pas tenir jusque là vous aller en presse et vous le lisez sur place kom g fait !! lol

_________________
LE CHEF IL TUE DES CHATONS !!!
Chapounette de Jo', Chapichou de Parencouille
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.harumscarum.canalblog.com
Jo'
Maître Capello Déchu
avatar

Masculin Nombre de messages : 6949
Age : 29
Localisation : Lille
Date d'inscription : 16/05/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Mar 6 Déc - 18:25

Rooooh t'es embetante hein,
y'en a qu'on pas le temps de glander dans les librairies ! Rolling Eyes

What a Face

Bon, z'vais chercher ^^

_________________

https://www.facebook.com/martintheisland
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://soad-fr.com
SidOuy
Hypnotic Computer
avatar

Féminin Nombre de messages : 215
Age : 27
Localisation : 77
Date d'inscription : 08/06/2005

MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   Mer 7 Déc - 17:56

Shocked Very Happy c'est quoi ce truc lol

je l'imprime et je traduirai sa en cours ^^ bon je pense pas que je vais tout traduire mais au moins la moitié des trucs... sa sera déja sa de fait! donc faudrait que quelqun d'autre traduise sa parce que demain et vendredi ya des bigs greves (pas du tout) dans mon lycée donc sa fait deja 2 jours en moins...

sinon j'ai vu sa dans Word :
Mr. Serj Tankian (pronounced Say-rj Tank-ee-an)
héhé

sympa la fin ya des petits dialogues retranscrits entre serjy et dada ( Razz )
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://fotow-by-sid.skyrock.com
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: [Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
[Interview] Une Fraction De Moments Authentiques
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 1

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Systemofadown .be .fr .eu :: News :: News // System Of A Down-
Sauter vers: